Tag: income inequality

Links 12/17/16

Fair Elections:

  • Time to Fire FBI Director James Comey If he’s not fired, future campaigns will convince public officials to improperly influence elections again. Since it worked, it will be copied. This was a blatant abuse of his power and a violation of the Hatch Act. Giuliani and everyone in the FBI who was in on it needs to be investigated.

National Security:

2016 Election:

Minimum Wage:

Retirement Insecurity:

Income Inequality:

Price Fixing:

Obamacare:

Women’s Voices Being Heard:

Jobs:

Transition Team:

Offshoring:

Poverty:

Wealth Gap:

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Links 12/15/16

2016 Election:

  • Bernie Sanders: Donald Trump Won Because People are Tired of the Same Old Politically Correct Rhetoric Sander’s definition of politically correct rhetoric in this case is definitely different than the most common usage of the term (which is more specifically about language that avoids putting marginalized groups at a disadvantage.) If he wants to contribute to changing that term, great. I’d rather that term evolve into a pejorative to describe inauthentic, poll-tested talking points than be a pejorative for language that avoids further marginalizing the less powerful.However, it would really be more accurate to say that many voters, rightly or wrongly, viewed Trump as more “authentic” and that contributed to his win.

    What is traditionally considered PC rhetoric is fine with the American people if they think someone actually means what they’re saying. Sanders is a prime example. He is much more popular than the politically incorrect Trump, yet Sanders’ statements about minority groups and women could be considered very politically correct.

    In my opinion, Trump won for three primary reasons: his ability to resonate with Rust Belt voters on the economy, James Comey’s violation of the Hatch Act, and failures on the part of the Clinton campaign. You could also throw in the fact that Trump’s more charismatic than Clinton, although he’s considered extremely unlikeable by the majority of the American public.

Inequality:

Minimum Wage:

Wealth Inequality:

  • Black Wealth in the Age of Trump Lots of interesting perspectives. Race played a role in this election, but I don’t think identity politics gave Trump his win. He eked out those electoral college victories in Wisconsin, Michigan, and Pennsylvania by turning voters who had voted for Obama in the previous election.

The Forgotten Rural Poor:

The Failure of the Democratic Party to Speak for the Working and Middle Classes:

White Collar Crime:

Unjustified Executive Compensation:

  • Obscene Pay Inequality Bad for Workers and Economy “Obscene CEO pay has been a major part of the story. In the 1960s, the typical CEO of a big corporation made 20 times what the average worker made. Now, it’s hundreds of times… The tax code is often used to encourage behavior we want to see….If shareholders realize that inequitable pay scales are reducing their after-tax profits, they will pay their CEO’s less and their regular workers a little more.” Good luck!

Links 12/13/16

Wealth Redistribution to the Rich:

  • Wells Fargo Becomes First Bank to Fail Sanctions for Failing Too-Big-To-Fail Test Who needs a living will when you have the taxpayers’ money to fall back on?
  • Taking from the Middle Class, Giving to the Rich: It’s the Malloy Way I live in CT, which is one of the worst states in the country in terms of income inequality. I’ve noticed that this behavior is common.
  • Watch Bernie Sanders Convince a Trump Voter She Voted for the Wrong Person- in Less than Two Minutes

    What all of us should know is that over the last 25 years, there has been a massive transfer of wealth in this country from you to the top one-tenth of one percent. In other words, the middle class has shrunk and trillions of dollars have gone to the top one-tenth of one percent. Do you think it’s inappropriate to start asking those people to pay their fair share of taxes so we can adequately fund Medicaid and make public colleges and universities tuition-free. Is that an unfair thing to ask?”

    After a pause, Sparks replied, “I don’t think it’s an unfair thing to ask. They got rich off of us, so it’s time they put back.”

    Once wealth redistribution for the poor is put into this context, people understand its justification.

    Wages:

  • Renters Facing Affordability Crisis As Wages Stagnate Yes, I used to work in leasing. There’s no justification for the rent increases. Wages aren’t increasing. The buildings aren’t getting better. Builders use cheaper and cheaper materials for new products and owners charge higher prices. The leasing offices love to introduce new fees for services that used to be free.
  • Trump Turns the Focus to Workers and Wages He has the opportunity to completely change the trajectory of the Republican party.

    Gender Pay Gap:

  • The Gender Pay Gap is Hurting Women’s Health This study is about Australia, but I think this phenomenon is real in the United States also.
  • Unjustified CEO Compensation:

  • CEO Pay: Can a Tax Address Income Inequality?
  • Chipotle Drops Dual-CEO Model Over $26 million per year for two CEO’s. What a waste.
  • Healthcare:

  • Why is Healthcare So Expensive?
  • Record-High Health Care Spending Hits $3.2 Trillion in 2015
  • United States Comes in Last Again in Health, Compared to Other Countries
  • Quality of Life:

  • Stress in America: ‘Everybody Outside of the Top is Suffering’
  • Origins of Happiness: Evidence and Policy Implications Contentment is a good end goal.

    Poverty:

  • Nearly 1 Million N.J. Residents Now Live in Poverty, as Rate Soars in Atlantic City
  • America’s Dirty Little Secret: 42 Million People are Suffering From Hunger
  • Poverty May Have a Greater Effect on Suicide Rates than do Unemployment or Foreclosures
  • Income Inequality:

  • Income Inequality Keeps Growing and Its Worse than We Thought
  • Weigel: Income Inequality Nightmare
  • How Should We Compensate the Losers from Globalization?
  • Capitalism is Working Better in France than in the U.S.
  • It’s policies like a higher minimum wage, higher unionization and more equal education that have let the bottom 50 percent do better in France than in the United States. Although that’s not to say that things have been great in France. Their bottom 50 percent have only had their incomes grow 0.9 percent a year. It’s just that anything is better than nothing, and nothing is what the U.S. working class has gotten for a long time now.

    The more money the rich make, the more money they have to lobby for the policies they want, which will then help them make even more money. Indeed, political scientists Martin Gilens of Princeton and Benjamin Page of Northwestern found that it almost doesn’t matter what average voters want when it comes to what bills Congress passes. All that matters is what elites and interest groups want. In other words, American democracy works for the top 1 percent because American capitalism does, and American capitalism works for the top 1 percent because American democracy does.

    They Won’t Be Ignored Anymore: How White Working Class Anger Elected Trump

    This is a great article from Joan C. Williams at the Harvard Business Review. The white working class, households with a median income of $64,000, have largely been ignored by both major parties. Each party, influenced by neoliberal ideas, supported trade deals like NAFTA that shipped working class jobs overseas.

    Trump, whatever you think of him and his politics, spoke to these people.

    Hopefully, this will be a message to both major parties. You cannot keep ignoring the needs of the working class and expect to be successful.

    The American Dream is Dying, but It Is Not Dead

    The American Dream is Dying, but It Is Not Dead

    The U.S was ranked sixth worst among 173 countries on income equality. However, most Americans are still unaware of the magnitude of the situation. When polled, not even half of us realize the extent of inequality in our own country. This blog is my attempt to understand how we got here, and more importantly, how we transcend this.

    What is the American dream? Economic mobility? A level playing field? A “chicken in every pot and a car in every garage?” A myth that never had much basis in fact? I want to hear what the American dream is to you. I want to hear your experiences of America during the Great Recession.

    The culmination of this project will be a work of historical fiction, released in installments, that will examine life among different classes in the United States.

    Help me tell your story. America has been called a “classless society” by people who want us to ignore the realities of poverty and of the working classes. I want to hear your voice.